For your mid-term paper, you will create your own theory/philosophy for motivati

For your mid-term paper, you will create your own theory/philosophy for motivati

For your mid-term paper, you will create your own theory/philosophy for motivation.   Remember, a theory is well-substantiated on empirical evidence and a philosophy is a broader examination knowledge and reality.   In organizations, it is belief or act that guides behavior.  
In developing your paper, you will include the following: 
1) Introduction
2) Literature review or research on that will support your philosophy.  For example, you may like elements of Maslow and the Hawthorne Studies, so you would discuss these theories, provide current relevance, in essence setting the stage for the remainder of your paper. 
3) Develop and share your philosophy.  When creating your philosophy, some thoughts to ponder that will help inspire your philosophy include:
What do you value in life and work?
What motivates you?
What are you hoping to achieve and create with your philosophy (besides a good grade ?)
Remember failure is an opportunity for learning and growth.
How do you maintain a positive outlook.
What inspires you, creates that spark to stay motivate. 
Now write ?
4) Apply your philosophy either using an actual or fictitious example.
5) Summary and Conclusion where you evaluate your philosophy, the strong and weak points, and any guidance for using. 
Additional Assignment Guidance:
Your paper should be a minimum of 8 pages in APA format (excluding title page and references) but encouraged use the number of pages needed to complete your assignment and address each of the elements effectively. NO ABSTRACT IS REQUIRED 
You need to use a minimum of 8 sources. Remember, for every source, you will have at least one citation. You cite information that is 1) not common knowledge, 2) paraphrased, and 3) directly quoted.
Submit your work as an MS WORD ATTACHMENT in either a .doc, .docx, or .rtf format.
You are encouraged to use subheadings. A subheading reflects the content that follows. Subheadings provide a point of reference for the reader as well as guide the reader through your paper.   If you do not have a clear thesis or your introduction is a bit complicated, the reader spends time guessing and is unclear as to what they are reading and why.  
Some Additional Writing tips:
When making a point, one of the most common mistakes is not to offer enough details. A paragraph without much detail will seem vague and incomplete. A paper is always strengthened when your claims are as specific as possible, the more detailed evidence you offer, and the more reference points your reader will have. Remember that you are communicating your understanding to a reader who has only your description to go by.
Third person is preferred in academic writing. Use first-person perspective where applicable and appropriate, i.e., describing your own role, distinguishing from your point of view and others, referring to your actions, or writing is reflective or contains personal elements, otherwise use 3rd person.
A flat statement of your intentions in the composition is called an announcement, which weakens the introduction. Try introducing the subject more temptingly, piquing the reader’s interest.
Avoid anthropomorphisms (attributing human characteristics to nonhuman or inanimate objects). Consider that no report can “address.”  When writing an introduction, some approaches are best avoided. Avoid starting sentences with “The purpose of this essay is . . .” or “In this essay I will . . .” or any similar flat announcement of your intention or topic.
Here is some guidance in formatting your citations:
Author mentioned in text: Smith (2007), otherwise use (Smith, 2007).
Include a page or paragraph number with all direct quotations = (Smith, 2007, p. 32).
Place the period at the end of a sentence after the citation. 
When using a cite within your source it is as follows: (Smith 2007, as cited by Smythe, 2016, p. 32).
Eliminate URL addresses with in-text citations.
Direct quotations greater than 40 words must be blocked and indented. Block quotations do not have quotation marks (except those already included in the source material).
Direct quotes should support your work and not replace it. You should use direct quotes ONLY:
to show that an authority supports your point
to present a position or argument to critique or comment on
to include especially moving or historically significant language
to present a particularly well-stated passage whose meaning would be lost or changed if paraphrased or summarized.