One way you could organize your reflection is to take a simplified gap-analysis

One way you could organize your reflection is to take a
simplified gap-analysis

One way you could organize your reflection is to take a
simplified gap-analysis approach for each of the two main topics for the
reflection:
What
happened?
What
did you do and what were the results of your work?
Remember
to mention the relevant evidence used to guide your approach to your
work.
What
went well?
What
did not go well?
How
did what happened differ from what should have happened?
If
relevant, mention the evidence that helped you formulate your prediction
about what should have happened.
How
are my experiences changing my thinking, analysis, and communication
patterns?
How
can I use this information to improve in the future?
If
relevant, look to the literature for support on a way to improve or
guide your potential changes.
While you can use any appropriate approach to organize your
reflection, be sure that in your reflection you address the following scoring
guide criteria:
Reflect
on process, outcomes, success, and improvement opportunities related to
the development of your literature synthesis.
Reflect
on process, outcomes, success, and improvement opportunities related to
collaboration and other relevant work at the project site.
Integrate
support from scholarly and authoritative sources to strengthen claims and
substantiate decision-making.
Communicate
orally in a clear, confident, and professional manner.